Choose the health content that’s right for you, and get it delivered right in your inbox.

Article Type: News

AdventHealth Waterman Begins New Program for Grieving Families and Patients

Tags:

2 items. To interact with these items, press Control-Option-Shift-Right Arrow
AdventHealth Waterman Begins New Program for Grieving Families and Patients

TAVARES, Fla., February 12, 2019 – AdventHealth Waterman is preparing to launch a new program designed to improve the bereavement process and reduces stress for grieving patients and families. 

Called the “Butterfly Project,” this new program uses evidence-based care for patients receiving hospice care, patients on comfort measures only, actively passing patients who are newly designated as Do Not Resuscitate (DNR), or patients planned for withdrawal of care. When any of these events occur, the bedside nurse can initiate the Butterfly Project, named to reflect the symbol of a human passing into the afterlife, just as a caterpillar transforms into a butterfly.

The Butterfly Project is highlighted by certain caring activities to improve the patient and family experience dramatically.  For example, simply placing a colorful blanket or shawl on the patient changes the look and feel of the room. As another example, when a hospice patient is withdrawn from care, the nurse works to create a sacred ambiance by removing unnecessary equipment, freshening up the patient, and placing more comfortable loungers in the room for family visitation.  Another hallmark of the Butterfly Project is a bereavement cart in the room with refreshments, light music, and lavender oil diffused into the area, creating a “homier” space where family members and patients could feel welcomed, safe, and cared for.

Additional Butterfly Project care includes giving mementos to close family members, such as a keepsake with the fingerprints of the deceased, or a lock of hair with a touching poem. 

Initially trialed in the intensive care unit (ICU), the result of these changes has been astonishing. Families reported feeling welcomed, some crying because of the difference in care they felt. 

Several hundred AdventHealth Waterman nurses recently underwent training on the Butterfly Project during the hospital’s annual Intensive Care Skills fair. Barb Richards of the AdventHealth Waterman education department led the training session in a variety of skills over a span of three days.  

In March, the Butterfly project will officially launch in the ICU, with phased roll outs planned for the cardiovascular-ICU, progressive care unit, and emergency department later this year.

About AdventHealth Waterman
AdventHealth Waterman in Tavares has 269-beds and is one of the six hospitals in Flagler, Lake and Volusia counties that composes the AdventHealth Central Florida Division - North Region. Formerly known as Florida Hospital Waterman, the organization’s parent company changed the name of all wholly-owned entities to AdventHealth on Jan. 2, 2019. Based in Altamonte Springs, AdventHealth is a connected system of care. With more than 80,000 team members, AdventHealth is one of the nation’s largest faith-based health care systems with nearly 50 hospitals and hundreds of care sites in nearly a dozen states. Florida Hospital Waterman is located in the heart of Lake County and was founded in 1938 by Frank Waterman. With the mission of Extending the Healing Ministry of Christ, AdventHealth Waterman provides whole person care to heal the body, mind and spirit. For more information about AdventHealth Waterman, visit http://AdventHealthWaterman.com. 

Photo Caption: 
Several hundred AdventHealth Waterman nurses recently underwent training on the Butterfly Project, a new program designed to improve the bereavement process and reduces stress for grieving patients and families. Pictured here, Kristen Ross, Ashley Jones and Tiffany Whitley stand in the mock “sacred space” set-up as a demo during the training session.

 

Tags:

2 items. To interact with these items, press Control-Option-Shift-Right Arrow